Field of Glory: The Lions of England

It’s been quite a long time since I’ve gotten some painting in for my Hundred Years’ War English 15mm army for Field of Glory. The army has been long in the making, started years ago. I had nearly finished it before my gaming group at the time stopped playing FoG, leaving me with little motivation to finish it.  All that was left were the commanders and the camp.

But now I return. I’ve added the commanders and the camp, bringing the army to a close. While I could add some bases for variety (say unmounted versions of the knights or some more archers and barricades), the army is done.

The army is based off the force that was present at the Battle of Crecy (1346) during the Hundred Years War. I tried to follow the actual units and heraldry of the lords that fought there. The bases for the commanders get a simple roman numeral on the front and back and stars to help differentiate them from the mass of troop bases.

The first commander, the army’s Commander in Chief, is King Edward III himself. He sits on his finely armored warhorse, flanked by the flag of England and his personal banner. Like the other banners in the army, I hand-painted the banners based on reference pics. I could have used printed banners, but decided to attempt the painting myself.

Next up is Edward III’s son, the Prince of Wales. While only 16 years old at the time of Crecy, Edward still commanded the 1st Battle, right wing of the army and proved himself in combat. The name of the Black Prince came later. The miniature here is accompanied by a banner man, flying the flag of England, festooned with the ribbon of the eldest son (also seen on the prince’s shield and horse armor). I added an archer to link him to Wales.

The last commander is William de Bohun, the Earl of Northhampton. He commanded the left wing of the army. While he has an elaborate decoration on his armor and horse, I decided to give him a simple pennant with the St. George’s Cross. Along with him I added Richard Fitzalan, the Earl of Arundel (or at least a liege knight).

The final pic is the English camp. All armies in Field of Glory are required to have a counter representing their rear camp, supplies, reserves, etc. I wanted it to look a little busy, the ground churned with activity, with plenty of soldiers moving about. The base has a grouping of tents, along with various guards and servants. I used extra models from the army (English billmen, mounted crossbowman, Welsh spearman, etc.). Since the French were shadowing the English and were blocking their way at Crecy, I figured the camp was set up with some haste; guards stand ready to defend just in case.

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