Archive for Orcs & Goblins

Saga: Fantasy 2nd edition

Posted in Miniatures with tags , , , , , , , , , , on April 23, 2018 by Sean

I’ve been updating my versions of the Warhammer Fantasy armies to Saga 2nd edition. The quick mechanics and characterful rules for factions works nicely with the distinct armies of Warhammer. As before, I reskinned battleboards, adapting to fit existing factions. Some day I plan on making my own original boards, but then again they plan on doing Saga: Fantasy in the future…

Starting off, we have a classic rivalry in the Dwarfs and Greenskins.

Dwarfs: I based their board on the Anglo-Danes, due to the stalwart nature of the Dwarf shieldwall and their grim determination.

Warlords are Thanes or Princes of Holds. They wield great weapons, decorated with runes of power (-1 armor for enemies in combat and -1 for the Warlord).

Hearthguard are the Holds’ Longbeards, Hammerers, or Ironbreakers, well motivated and well armored. They can have a standard weapon and shield, or carry great weapons (-1 armor for foes and the unit).

Warriors are Clan Dwarfs, the common soldiers of the Hold.

Levies are the Beardlings, young Dwarfs who cover their elders’ advance with bow and sling.

Orcs: Their board is based off the Vikings- the Orcs (and their subordinate Goblins) are pure aggression and violence.

Warlords are the Big Bosses and Warbosses, the biggest and the meanest Greenskin of the tribe.

Hearthguard are the Big’Uns and Black Orcs, armed to the teeth and well-armored. One unit of 4 Hearthguard can be fielded as Savage Orcs (Berserkers).

Warriors are the Boyz, big green monsters ready and able to fight.

Levies are the measly Goblins that the Orcs browbeat to fight for them. Preferring to fight at range, they are armed with bows or javelins.

Next is another rivalry, the noble High Elves and the evil Dark Elves.

High Elves: The Elves use the Scots rules. Their defensive nature and counter-attack abilities seem to match well.

Warlords are Princes or Nobles; they can be mounted on Elven steeds

Hearthguard are one of the martial orders, either Swordmasters, Phoenix Guard, or White Lions; they can be mounted, coming from the Silver Helms or Dragon Princes traditions.

Warriors are from the ranks of the Spearmen and Sea Guard.

Levies are the largely defensive Militia, armed with bow or javelins.

Dark Elves: The Dark Elves’ swift cavalry and murderous ranged power combines to make them deadly combatants. With this in mind, I used the Normans rules.

Warlords are the nobles, princelings, and dark lords of the Dark Elves. They can fight on foot, or ride dexterous horses or Cold Ones.

Hearthguards come from the ranks of the Black Guard, Executioners, Witch Elves, and Cold One Knights. They can fight on foot, or ride horses or Cold Ones. They can also choose to all be mounted with javelins, becoming elite Dark Riders or Darkfire Warlocks.

Warriors are the City Guard, trained Dark Elven soldiers, and the Corsairs. Units can be mounted, representing the Dark Riders and lesser Knights. On foot, City Guard are armed with spear and shield, while one unit of up to 8 can carry the iconic crossbows (-1 Armor on ranged targets, but also -1 Armor themselves because they lack shields).

Levies are made up of Slaves, pushed to battle for their masters. Some can be prisoner Dark Elves, High Elves, or various other captured races. They are armed with bows.

The final rivalry here is Nurgle vs. Tzeentch.

Nurgle: Nurgle’s children play the long game, grinding their opponent down through disease and exhaustion, resisting repeated charges with unfeeling flesh and breaking them with merciless counter-attacks. The Anglo-Dane rules suit them. The Fatigues the army can lay on their opponents could be seen as disease and decay.

Warlords are the Champions of Nurgle, bloated with plague, bearing great scythes and rusted flails. They count as carrying Dane Axes (-1 Armor for targets in melee, and -1 Armor versus enemy melee attacks).

Hearthguard are the Chosen, immensely tough and implacable. They can be gifted with great weapons or other mutations (giving them Dane Axes) or more mundane weapons.

Warriors are the Warriors of Nurgle, the common soldiers of the Plague God, with the most blessed Marauders joining their ranks.

Levies are desperate and lost commoners, weakened by mutation and disease, following the warband in worship of Father Nurgle. They carry bows or slings.

Tzeentch: The Carolingians’ action/reaction system and the ability to manipulate the battleboard on a whim make a good translation of Tzeentch’s mastery of change. The faction also allows you to choose the other Frankish dynasties, allowing for even more variety.

Warlords are the Champions of Tzeentch, powerful fighters and masters of sorcery. They may be mounted on a Chaos steed.

Hearthguard are the Chosen, the fighters decided by fate and effort to serve their master, wielding the finest weapons and foul magics. They may be mounted on Chaos steeds. They can also all be fielded as armed with javelins (spellcasters) instead, representing a mounted coven.

Warriors are the Conspirators, a mix of Chaos Warriors and Sorcerers. Any units may be fielded as a Coven of Chaos, counting as being armed with bows (or magic spells) but they wear lighter armor, reduced to Armor 3. Warriors can also be equipped with normal weapons and armor; they may also be mounted on steeds and armed with javelins.

Levies are Cultists, lesser members of the warband. They represent hangers-on, pawns, and apprentices. They are armed with bows (though again this could represent a spell blast).

More factions are coming. The factions I swapped for Aetius & Arthur rules still apply.

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AoS: Waaagh Further

Posted in Miniatures with tags , , , , , , on January 3, 2018 by Sean

While working on projects for clients, I’ve been doing some work on my own Age of Sigmar force of Orruks and Grots. It’s mostly just adding to existing units of Ardboyz and Moonclan Squigs.

The Ardboyz are of course the old Black Orcs. At 2000 points, my Ironjawz force has three mobs of Ardboyz, so I had to build additional command models. In this case, here are one unit’s Standard Bearer and a Boss. Both use standard Black Orc bits, with some pieces from Orcs, Brutes, and some extra equipment pieces (including a random satchel from a WWII German sprue). The Boss also has a jagged sword with his left arm from the Brutes kit.

The other pic is a couple of Ardboyz from one unit. Two carry big choppaz, while the middle carries a choppa and shield. Again they have extra bits from other kits, like the head from the Brutes, with a jaw plate from a 40K Ork sprue. The other big choppa boy swings a halberd-like weapon converted from a Brute sword.

 

I have acquired more Squig models, allowing me to field a 10-squig unit, or by adding in more of the previously shown Blood Bowl Grots I can field a 15-squig unit. The mob still has a Blood Bowl player as a leader-type, and a Squig Rider for variety.

The last pic is my Moonclan arrayed before a game. At 2000 points, the army is a Warboss (with Squig), 2 Shamans, 2 x40 Grots units with spears, 20 Grots with bows, 2 x3 Fanatics, 3 Fellwater Troggoths, a Mangler Squig, 10 Squigs, 2 x4 Squig Herders, and 2 Spear Chukkas.

Squigs!

Posted in Miniatures with tags , , , on October 22, 2017 by Sean

 

I’ve been adding the final touches to my Moonclan Grots for Age of Sigmar. The final unit (for now) are the Cave Squigs. I plan on fielding either 2 5-Squig units, or a big 10-Squig mob, backed by 6 Handlers. Small, cheap, and expendable, but capable of dealing good damage on a lucky turn.

I finished the first group of Cave Squigs (featured earlier) using a group of old 4th edition Squig models, as well as a single Squig Hopper. The final member is a Blood Bowl Pogo player. I felt he would work as a Handler leading from the front (he IS a loonie after all). I wanted to add another 5 Squigs to the unit to round it out, but have encountered a complete inability to get them. The Cave Squigs blister seems to be sold out everywhere, even on GW’s website. Something had to be done…

In my searches through my bitz collection and random old minies I unearthed a bunch of Blood Bowl Goblins. These little guys have great character, with the detail style dating from 1st ed. They do have the somewhat unfortunate posing from that era (what I call the flat ‘limbs-akimbo’ pose). This was common for all Blood Bowl models at the time. To be fair, there’s not much a Blood Bowl player could be doing other than sort of threatening, though some of the positions lent a little more variety (runners, throwers, etc.). Luckily I had 5 Goblins, so they would serve as Cave Squigs. I like to think of these Grots charging the opponents in wild abandon, delivering sudden punches and stabbings before being squished or running off.

The Squig Handlers are as equally ragtag as their charges, a mix of 4th ed. metals and 5th-6th ed. plastics, with a random Goblin with a mallet from 5th or 6th ed. artillery crew. They carry pokin’ sticks and spears, as well the mallet and some custom cymbals to motivate/guide the Squigs. I plan on making some cheerleader or coach models to accompany the Blood Bowl players at some future date.

Goblins: Skarsnik and the Squigs

Posted in Miniatures with tags , , , , on September 19, 2017 by Sean

 

I’ve come back to my Goblins (aka the Moonclan Grots) for Age of Sigmar. The majority of the army has been done for some time, but I wanted to expand my options.

The Grot Warboss has a variety of weapon options to choose from. I’ve already painted up a Warboss with sword and shield, and another with great weapon. The other option I was interested in was a moon prodder and attack squig. I had the 4th edition Night Goblin character Skarsnik, accompanied by his favorite squig Nobbla, so he’ll fit in nicely. Skarsnik is effectively gone now anyway.

The Warboss/Skarsnik is a wonderful example of the 4th edition modeling aesthetic- a flat 2 part cast, arms and legs akimbo. He has a good amount of detail, extra weapons, and lots of skulls. He is pretty big for a goblin too, but that works for an important character. I gave him the red hood found on all the army’s characters (to help them stand out from their black hooded troops). He also got some nice checkers on his sword and dog’s teeth on his robe. Though those are part of the army’s theme, they are fairly sparse for the Grots compared to the Orruks.

Gobbla is a huge squig, with as much detail as his boss. Lots of warts, vasculature, and random scars, as well as giant chompers. Both models are mounted on a resin base from Secret Weapon. A rough rock surface, dotted with Dwarf runes.

Next are some of the Cave Squigs that I’ve been workin on for the army. In the end, there will be 10 Squigs in the unit, after which I will finish up some Grots with pointy sticks to herd them along. One of the Squigs has a missing foot, broken off the model long ago. So he gets a peg leg, which in true Grot fashion, is wrongly-sized, but the Squig bounces randomly anyway, so no problem.

The Squigs color was achieved with a base coat of P3 Sanguine Base, highlighted with mixes of GW Khorne Red, Mephiston Red, Troll Slayer Orange, and Flash Gitz Yellow. The Squig with Skarsnik got an additional wash of red ink.

Saga: Thundering Hooves

Posted in Miniatures with tags , , , , , , on August 31, 2017 by Sean

I’ve finally finished the 8-man mounted Hearthguard unit for my Briton warband for Saga: Aetius & Arthur. I posted the first half of the unit earlier. They’ll also serve as Roman mounted troops as well.

The newest members include a leader type, a musician, a draco standard and a Roman signum, reflecting the mixed culture of the Romano-British models I used for the unit. I chose the standard of Legio vigesima Valeria Victrix (Twentieth Victorious Valeria Legion) which saw action in Briton in the later years of the Empire. While the unit has a roundel shield design, I added a few odd shields for individuality. The signum bearer has a small target shield with a serpent, the horn blower has a wolf, and the unit’s ‘leader’ (the second in command of the warband after the Warlord) has a unique dragon shield.

I gave the signum bearer dark skin to reflect some of the recent archeology on Rome in Britannia. I figured he was either a Berber or North African recruit, or even a recruit all the way over from the Middle East. I have also read of the grave of a Syrian who was in the Roman army found at Hadrian’s Wall, so decided to reflect that.

My group and I have been playing lots of games with the new factions. I’ve played as the Saxons, Romans, Britons, and Huns, and played against Saxons, Romans, Picts, and Britons. I haven’t tried the Goths yet, since their battle board seems so weird (emphasis on balancing Fatigue, but encouraging accumulating it).

Recently we played a Romans versus Huns, using the Champions of God scenario from Saga: The Crescent and the Cross book. My friend fielded his Romans (Warlord, 8 Hearthguard, 16 Warriors with spear, 8 bow Warriors, 6 Levy with spear, and a Manubalista) versus my Huns (mounted Warlord, 12 mounted Hearthguard, 16 mounted Warriors, and 12 bow Levy). For this game I once again broke out my grisly Goblin Wolf Riders. I’d love to some day build up an actual human mounted force, but until then only my Gobbos have enough cavalry to substitute. I also use my Goblins for the Spanish faction, another potentially all-mounted army.

The game got off to a quick start, with the Huns using their board’s ability to move the whole army (with bonus distance for cavalry) right up into the Romans’ faces. I knew the Manubalista could potentially wreck my mounted troops, so I concentrated bow fire, wiping it out after its one shot (that my guys miraculously saved against). The left Roman flank collapsed within 2 turns, the Roman commander fleeing as fast as he could to the rest of his army. The Roman right flank had been held up by my Levy archers and some careful use of Fatigue from a small skirmishing cav unit.

I could have simply retreated then and there, since the scenario was based on VP’s for kills, and I had crushed half his army for a only a little damage to my own forces. Instead I decide to make it a fun game, so the Huns swung around and chased after the Warlord and got into a scrum with the remaining Roman infantry. I wore his forces down until the scenario ended. having lost a bunch of my army needlessly. However, he couldn’t make up the gap in VP’s so win for the Huns!

Saga: Fantasy- A&A

Posted in Miniatures with tags , , , , , , , , , on August 19, 2017 by Sean

 

 

I’ve been playing the newest Saga expansion, the Late Roman-era Aetius & Arthur. I thought some of the new factions would work nicely for some of the Warhammer factions I couldn’t match up before.

Empire: The regimented order of the army and its ability to hold the line and initiate sudden strikes that the Roman faction uses would fit the Empire. This version of the Empire is an ‘earlier’ tech level of the city-states, before widespread gunpowder weapons.

Warlords are Empire nobles, career officers or blue blood royalty. They can fight on foot or mounted on fine steeds.

Hearthguard are the Knights, the elite core of the Knightly Orders like the Reiksguard, Knights Panther, or Blazing Sun, fighting mounted, or Greatswords and Swordsmen, fighting on foot. For an additional 1 point, up to 8 Hearthguard can be fielded as Cataphracts, representing the Inner Circles of the Knightly Orders

Warrior are the State Troops, loyal soldiers of the city-states. They can fight with sword, spear, or halberd (with Armor 4), or take to the field as Huntsmen, carrying bows (with Armor 3).

Levies are the Militia, the common rabble called to defend their realm. They can carry shortbows and throwing axes (javelins) or be fielded as the Free Companies. Free Companies generate 1 Attack for 2 members in melee (unlike normally 1 for 3), and have Armor 4. The player may also remove 6 Levy and replace them with an Artillery Piece manned by 2 Levy crewmen. The piece (Range 2xL) could represent any of the weapons of the Empire, like a bolt thrower or light cannon. The Artillery generates Attack dice when it shoots equal to half the members of the target, reducing their Armor by 1. Each time it fires it gains a Fatigue.

Lizardmen: I figured the defensive nature of the Britons, backed by their heroic Warlords fighting on the front line, leading by example, and directing their men to victory worked to represent the Lizardmen, or at least a Saurus and Skink-focused force.

The key value for the army is Inspiration. Units within S (2″) of the Warlord count as being Inspired. Various battle board abilities only work for Inspired units.

Warlords are Scar Veterans and Oldbloods, ancient born fighters, survivors of countless battles, and direct servants of the Slaan. They can fight on foot or ride Cold Ones. The Warlord can be accompanied by a pair of Temple Guard, called Companions. They form a unit with the Warlord. The Companions extend the 2″ range of the Warlord’s Inspiration from themselves as well. If the Warlord has Companions, he cannot use Side by Side.

Hearthguard are the Temple Guard, hand-picked Saurus decked in the finest armor and jeweled weapons. They can fight on foot or ride Cold Ones.

Warriors are appropriately the Saurus Warriors, bestial reptilian soldiers of the Slann cities.

Levies are the Skinks, diminutive skirmishers and scouts. While lacking in combat ability, they can rain death from their javelins or blowpipes (bows/slings).

Savage Orcs: I decided after playing the Saxons several times, the utter mindless brutality of the Savage Orcs was a good fit. With only fighting on their frenzied minds, the Orcs rush into combat heedless of danger, determined to crush the enemy or die trying.

Warlords are the Savage Orc Bosses, hulking beasts of green muscle, protected by bone ornaments and warpaint, their belief in their invulnerability equal to true armor.

Hearthguard are the Big ‘Uns, the strongest members of the tribe. They group in mobs of their own, ready to stomp anything in reach.

Warriors are the Boyz, the common Orcs of the savage tribes. They lack the brutal strength of the Big ‘uns but make up for it in numbers.

Levy are the Yoofs, the youngest and weakest Orcs. Not yet to the level of a proper member of the mobs, they instead use ranged weapons to pelt the foe while the Boyz close in. Alternatively they could represent Forest Goblins pressed into service. They are armed with bows or slings.

 

And here is a break from Aetius & Arthur factions. I wanted to add in an older faction that I never got around to, based on the Normans from Saga: Dark Age.

Wood Elves: The mixture of archery and shock cavalry exemplified by the Normans fit the Wood Elves well enough. It does somewhat ignore some the stronger close combat units and the various tree spirits, but it will do for now.

Warlords are the Kindred, leaders of one of the numerous kinbands. They can represent Glade Lords, fighting on foot or mounted on stag or Elven steed, or even Branchwraiths or Treemen fighting on foot.

Hearthguards are the Nobles, elite guardians of the Wood Elf realms. They can fight on foot, using their swordstaves, or launch themselves into combat as Wardancers. They can also take to battle mounted as the Sisters of the Thorn or Wild Riders. Alternatively, Heardguard on foot can also be represented by Dryads.

Warriors are the Eternal Guard, the common members of the kinbands. They fight in ranks of spear on foot, or mounted as Glade Riders. One unit (of up to 8 members) can carry Elven Longbows, representing the Waywatchers. Longbow-armed units reduce their targets’ Armor by 1, but also lower their own Armor by 1.

Levies are the Glade Guard, the militia of the army. They carry bows, firing in massed ranks of black-feathered arrows.

There’s still more factions to convert to Saga: Fantasy. I’ll add them eventually.

AoS: Time Fer Stompin’

Posted in Miniatures with tags , , , , on August 11, 2017 by Sean

 

Along with other projects, I’ve finished up my second unit of Orruk Brutes for my Ironjawz army for Age of Sigmar. Just in time for the release of the General’s Handbook II. I hope my Stormbringaz can handle the changes.

The Brutes here follow the lead of the previous unit, with a Brute Boss with club and claw, 3 standard 2-choppa Brutes, and a Brute with a giant spiky cleaver. The unit was designed to be able to field 2 units of Brutes, or swap it for a unit of Ardboyz if I wanted (same cost after all). However, I figured I could also use them to field a full 10-boyz unit. The Brute Boss for this unit would be ‘demoted’ to a standard Brute, the more decorated Boss from the the other unit leading the way.

The Brutes as pieces are somewhat limited in their posing. The bodies include the legs and back torso, with the front and arms separate. Individuality comes from swapping out the heads, arms, and shoulder plates. I managed to avoid replicating the previous unit’s members. Extra plates and some weapon swaps finished them off.

The Boss’ weapons only attach to the torso one way. Thus he would have been a duplicate to the other Boss. To avoid this, I swapped the right hand with the club to another arm and gave him the front plate with the jawbone and head with the metal jaw plate.

Once the Handbook comes out, I plan on working on my Moonclan Grots. I’ll want to use them to support the Ironjawz, or vice versa. A unit of Brutes or Ardboyz would give the Grots some real punch.