Crimson Fists: Sword and Hammer

Posted in Miniatures with tags , , on November 4, 2017 by Sean

 

More Crimson Fists! Yeah, surprising I’m sure.

After working on Primaris Marines for so long, we’re back at ‘standard’ elite superhumans. I’m in the middle of an Assault Squad, wearing jump packs. There’s another unit without jump packs in the pipe next. These Marines are part of the first jump pack squad.

The Assault Marines are a mix of the old and new plastics. I like the newer designs’ posing, and the little rubble piles elevate them a bit more. The Veteran Sergeant gets a lot of decoration, and is tooled out with plasma pistol and power axe. He’s ready for a fight. The rest of his squad are typical Crimson Fists, following the usual color scheme. Free-handing the ‘X’ Assault symbol on the right shoulder was not easy.

The other pic is yet another Chaplain for the Marines. This is the 4th Chaplain I’ve done for the Crimson Fists, so you can’t say they don’t have some proper spiritual guidance. This was actually a pewter cast, showing its relative age. I like his decoration, with scrolls and purity seals hung from all over, even making a sort of loincloth. Overall he has a pretty simple color scheme, generically a Chaplain, but the large of amount of parchment all over him add some variety. His red gauntlets indicate his chapter.

More Assault Marines on the way.

Advertisements

Saga: Saxons vs. Britons

Posted in Miniatures with tags , , , , on November 1, 2017 by Sean

I recently played a game of Saga: Aetius & Arthur, where my Britons fought the Saxons.

The scenario was Retreat. We figured after yet another skirmish between the invading Saxons and the native Britons, the Britons were retreating back to a stronghold, pursued by Saxons. We used 6 point armies.

The Britons were a mounted Warlord, 8 mounted Hearthguard, 24 Warriors, and 12 bow Levy. I’ve posted the Warlord and Hearthguard here already. To represent the Britons I used my Welsh and some of my Anglo-Saxons.

The Saxons were led by the original trouble brothers, Hengist and Horsa. The rest of their warband were 8 Hearthguard, 16 Warriors, and a unit of Hunting Dogs. The Saxons were my friend’s army, and are in the process of being painted.

In the scenario, the defender sets up in a thin band at about 1/3 from the attacker’s edge. The attacker sets up across from him near their edge, but can also deploy up to 2 points of units from the opposite edge to cut off their retreat (they start with Fatigue, representing their rush to cut off the retreat). The defender has to get as much of his force off that edge as he can, while the attacker just wants kills. The defenders are assumed to have been running or recovering from the earlier fight, so every Defender unit has Fatigue at the start.

The Britons held the center, anchored by a cottage on one flank and woods on the other, the center a swamp occupied by the bow Levy. The Saxons started with both Warlords and their Hearthguard on the close side, with a unit of Warriors in the middle, and sent the Dogs and the other unit of Warriors around back.

The battle began with some quick movement from the Saxon on both sides, threatening my force immediately. I responded with a few retreat moves, but decided I needed to break the pursuers before they could press their advantage. The Hearthguard charged the nearest warlord, Hengist, pushing him back but unable to kill him. After a countercharge, they were able to bring him down, but at the cost of half the unit. The Fatigue across my whole army was eating activations to remove, since I didn’t want to face the Saxons in combat with Fatigue.

In response to his brother’s death, Horsa went ham on my army, cutting down most of a unit of Warriors in repeated charges. My opponent was able to use his Battleboard ability to just remove Defense dice when he had better armor than my units, easily done with a Warlord who doesn’t get Fatigues from fights. My own efforts to fight through the rear attackers floundered, with great saves by the Saxons and poor saves on my own part leading to losses or ties, keeping my forces hemmed in.

The last part of the battle had little left on the table. Horsa slew my Warlord and his Hearthguard. crushing the last few Warriors in the center. My last group of Warriors finally was able to squeeze through the gap of the rear guard and escape, a measly 5 men out of the whole army.

The last men in my army were the bow Levy left behind in the swamp. Horsa turned his attention to them, launching himself into their ranks. He cut down 4 of the Levy, but miraculously he must have slipped and sank into the murky water or something, as the Levy managed to kill him in combat. After that the game ended.

In the end, it was a Saxon victory by 3 VP’s. They killed my Warlord, 8 Hearthguard, 19 Warriors, and 4 Levy, but paid for it, with the loss of both of the Warlords, 8 Hearthguard, 15 Warriors, and 5 Dogs. This was a horrific battle, with the loss of 3 Warlords!

My Britons performed ok, but I made the mistake of fighting the Saxons head-on instead of retreating, as the scenario wanted. The Saxons did very well, chasing my units, forcing fights and cutting my men down. Their rear guard held my units the whole game, buying his forces time.

More battles in time.

Squigs!

Posted in Miniatures with tags , , , on October 22, 2017 by Sean

 

I’ve been adding the final touches to my Moonclan Grots for Age of Sigmar. The final unit (for now) are the Cave Squigs. I plan on fielding either 2 5-Squig units, or a big 10-Squig mob, backed by 6 Handlers. Small, cheap, and expendable, but capable of dealing good damage on a lucky turn.

I finished the first group of Cave Squigs (featured earlier) using a group of old 4th edition Squig models, as well as a single Squig Hopper. The final member is a Blood Bowl Pogo player. I felt he would work as a Handler leading from the front (he IS a loonie after all). I wanted to add another 5 Squigs to the unit to round it out, but have encountered a complete inability to get them. The Cave Squigs blister seems to be sold out everywhere, even on GW’s website. Something had to be done…

In my searches through my bitz collection and random old minies I unearthed a bunch of Blood Bowl Goblins. These little guys have great character, with the detail style dating from 1st ed. They do have the somewhat unfortunate posing from that era (what I call the flat ‘limbs-akimbo’ pose). This was common for all Blood Bowl models at the time. To be fair, there’s not much a Blood Bowl player could be doing other than sort of threatening, though some of the positions lent a little more variety (runners, throwers, etc.). Luckily I had 5 Goblins, so they would serve as Cave Squigs. I like to think of these Grots charging the opponents in wild abandon, delivering sudden punches and stabbings before being squished or running off.

The Squig Handlers are as equally ragtag as their charges, a mix of 4th ed. metals and 5th-6th ed. plastics, with a random Goblin with a mallet from 5th or 6th ed. artillery crew. They carry pokin’ sticks and spears, as well the mallet and some custom cymbals to motivate/guide the Squigs. I plan on making some cheerleader or coach models to accompany the Blood Bowl players at some future date.

Primaris: Witchfire

Posted in Miniatures with tags , , , on September 30, 2017 by Sean

The Primaris reinforcements continue to arrive for the Crimson Fists Space Marines.

The Primaris Librarian looms ominously, his cloak billowing around his towering form. While his armor is blue, it is a lighter blue than the Crimson Fists’ Kantor Blue; see previous Librarians. I decided to keep his color scheme dark, since I figured a bright robe would overshadow him. The black outer robe gives him a sinister air (appropriate for a user of the warp) while his inner robe is a simple brown, which is a nice neutral color against the blue armor. The purity seals break up the great fields of black and blue.

The rest of the Marines are some more Primaris to fill in the army’s Intercessor Squads.

The Sergeant wears his red helmet on his hip, drawing an absurdly big knife as he directs his men. The knife and left arm are from the Reivers set, but works here to give him a nice movement.

The Marines with grenade launchers have a good pose, looking like they’re thumping some rounds down range. The posability of the Primaris kit gives plenty of life to the models, an improvement over the simpler designs of the boxed game set.

Goblins: Skarsnik and the Squigs

Posted in Miniatures with tags , , , , on September 19, 2017 by Sean

 

I’ve come back to my Goblins (aka the Moonclan Grots) for Age of Sigmar. The majority of the army has been done for some time, but I wanted to expand my options.

The Grot Warboss has a variety of weapon options to choose from. I’ve already painted up a Warboss with sword and shield, and another with great weapon. The other option I was interested in was a moon prodder and attack squig. I had the 4th edition Night Goblin character Skarsnik, accompanied by his favorite squig Nobbla, so he’ll fit in nicely. Skarsnik is effectively gone now anyway.

The Warboss/Skarsnik is a wonderful example of the 4th edition modeling aesthetic- a flat 2 part cast, arms and legs akimbo. He has a good amount of detail, extra weapons, and lots of skulls. He is pretty big for a goblin too, but that works for an important character. I gave him the red hood found on all the army’s characters (to help them stand out from their black hooded troops). He also got some nice checkers on his sword and dog’s teeth on his robe. Though those are part of the army’s theme, they are fairly sparse for the Grots compared to the Orruks.

Gobbla is a huge squig, with as much detail as his boss. Lots of warts, vasculature, and random scars, as well as giant chompers. Both models are mounted on a resin base from Secret Weapon. A rough rock surface, dotted with Dwarf runes.

Next are some of the Cave Squigs that I’ve been workin on for the army. In the end, there will be 10 Squigs in the unit, after which I will finish up some Grots with pointy sticks to herd them along. One of the Squigs has a missing foot, broken off the model long ago. So he gets a peg leg, which in true Grot fashion, is wrongly-sized, but the Squig bounces randomly anyway, so no problem.

The Squigs color was achieved with a base coat of P3 Sanguine Base, highlighted with mixes of GW Khorne Red, Mephiston Red, Troll Slayer Orange, and Flash Gitz Yellow. The Squig with Skarsnik got an additional wash of red ink.

Saga: Thundering Hooves

Posted in Miniatures with tags , , , , , , on August 31, 2017 by Sean

I’ve finally finished the 8-man mounted Hearthguard unit for my Briton warband for Saga: Aetius & Arthur. I posted the first half of the unit earlier. They’ll also serve as Roman mounted troops as well.

The newest members include a leader type, a musician, a draco standard and a Roman signum, reflecting the mixed culture of the Romano-British models I used for the unit. I chose the standard of Legio vigesima Valeria Victrix (Twentieth Victorious Valeria Legion) which saw action in Briton in the later years of the Empire. While the unit has a roundel shield design, I added a few odd shields for individuality. The signum bearer has a small target shield with a serpent, the horn blower has a wolf, and the unit’s ‘leader’ (the second in command of the warband after the Warlord) has a unique dragon shield.

I gave the signum bearer dark skin to reflect some of the recent archeology on Rome in Britannia. I figured he was either a Berber or North African recruit, or even a recruit all the way over from the Middle East. I have also read of the grave of a Syrian who was in the Roman army found at Hadrian’s Wall, so decided to reflect that.

My group and I have been playing lots of games with the new factions. I’ve played as the Saxons, Romans, Britons, and Huns, and played against Saxons, Romans, Picts, and Britons. I haven’t tried the Goths yet, since their battle board seems so weird (emphasis on balancing Fatigue, but encouraging accumulating it).

Recently we played a Romans versus Huns, using the Champions of God scenario from Saga: The Crescent and the Cross book. My friend fielded his Romans (Warlord, 8 Hearthguard, 16 Warriors with spear, 8 bow Warriors, 6 Levy with spear, and a Manubalista) versus my Huns (mounted Warlord, 12 mounted Hearthguard, 16 mounted Warriors, and 12 bow Levy). For this game I once again broke out my grisly Goblin Wolf Riders. I’d love to some day build up an actual human mounted force, but until then only my Gobbos have enough cavalry to substitute. I also use my Goblins for the Spanish faction, another potentially all-mounted army.

The game got off to a quick start, with the Huns using their board’s ability to move the whole army (with bonus distance for cavalry) right up into the Romans’ faces. I knew the Manubalista could potentially wreck my mounted troops, so I concentrated bow fire, wiping it out after its one shot (that my guys miraculously saved against). The left Roman flank collapsed within 2 turns, the Roman commander fleeing as fast as he could to the rest of his army. The Roman right flank had been held up by my Levy archers and some careful use of Fatigue from a small skirmishing cav unit.

I could have simply retreated then and there, since the scenario was based on VP’s for kills, and I had crushed half his army for a only a little damage to my own forces. Instead I decide to make it a fun game, so the Huns swung around and chased after the Warlord and got into a scrum with the remaining Roman infantry. I wore his forces down until the scenario ended. having lost a bunch of my army needlessly. However, he couldn’t make up the gap in VP’s so win for the Huns!

Old One Eye

Posted in Miniatures with tags , on August 25, 2017 by Sean

 

Why, it’s Old One Eye himself, the great Carnifex specimen for the Tyranids. This fellow (lady?) is the very rare unique Tyranid character to be found in the army. The army will be focused around the big beasties, rather than swarms of little goons.

Old One Eye follows the Tyranids I’ve done so far, with the same skin and carapace color scheme, with yellow spotting on the upper shell, continued over the back scales and the big crushing claws. He sports extra spiky bits to better distinguish him from other Carnifex (that and his exposed skull). His shell is dotted with battle damage as well.

I decided to replicate the glowing blades of the Swarmlord’s boneswords. The scything talons and crushing claws have red hot edges, blended from black to yellow. I wanted his weapons to look extremely dangerous, heated to a blazing edge. The painting progression is Black->Khorne Red->Troll Slayer Orange->P3 Khador Red Highlight->Flash Gitz Yellow. The glow is also seen on the back spikes, ala Godzilla, revving up for a bio-plasma blast.

The exposed skull was done as normal for bone, but I added Xereus Purple at the edges of the flesh, with Screamer Pink highlights. This kept the colors a compliment to the yellow spots and works well with the green carapace.

More Carnifexes are in the future for the army, so more to come.